Core English Poem Machine

Resources and Examples

resources on this page:
CEPM Conversion Chart
Using the Chart
An Example Using the Number "68"
A Detailed Example

other Core English Pages:
The Core English Poem Machine
About the CEPM and How It Got Here
Key to Pronunciation
Making Core English Poetry

CPEM Conversion Chart
Range Name Number Range
"lih" 23 - 44
"roy" 45 - 66
"awe" 67 - 88
"is" 89 - 99


Using the Chart

1. See which range the number to be converted is in.
make a note of the range name (note: range names were created using the CEPM).

2. Subtract 22 from your number as many times as necessary until the result is between 0 and 22.

3. The number that results in #2 above is the number to run through the CEPM.

4. To ensure that your final results reflect the difference between a number that started out under 22 and one that had to be converted, use the range name as part of the final core english words.

 

An Example Using the Number "68"
"68" is in the awe range. Awe is the sound that will accompany any core english words that arise from using "68" with the CEPM.

 68
-22
 46
 46
-22
 24
 24
-22
  2

Thus the actual number that will be used with the CEPM is "2" along with its range name awe.
So "1968" [19, 2+awe] when run through the CEPM will be: 19 = oo+, 2=d(+awe)
The final core english word for the year 1968 is "oodawe".


A Detailed Example

The following example demonstrates some of the many ways to format dates and other numbersfor use with the CEPM.   In this example, I have use the date on which I discovered the Core English Poem Machine, February 17, 1968. It results in some totally unexpected sounds that I now use to express the spirit and memory of that occasion. When I say them over and over, I am reminded of the sounds babies make when they are learning to speak and are enjoying what their mouths and lips can do.

TIP: In both examples below, note that I used the full 4-digit year date in order to generate pairs of numbers to run through the CEPM. Pairs make for more easily pronounced words

American system:  2/17/1968

The date is divided into sets of 2 numbers each:   [2, 17] and [19, 68*].

Using the CEPM, these sets make the following sounds:
2= +ah, 17= y   core word = "yah"
19= oo+ 68= d(awe)**   core word = "ood(awe)"

The raw CEPM chant is "yah ood(awe)".

 

European system:  17.2.1968

The date is divided into sets of 2 numbers each:  [17, 2] and [19, 68].

Using the CEPM, these sets make the following sounds:
17= i+  2= d   "id", (say: I'd)
19= oo+  68= d(awe)** Makes the core word "ood(awe)".

The raw CEPM chant is "I'd ood(awe)."

 

Playing with the results until they fit nicely in my mouth, I get:

"YA OO DAW, I DO DAW"

 

* "68,"a number to be converted via the CEPM Conversion Chart.
** Range names accompany any number over 22 after it is converted.

 

Top

resources on this page:
CEPM Conversion Chart
Using the Chart
An Example Using the Number "68"
A Detailed Example

other Core English Pages:
The Core English Poem Machine
About the CEPM and How It Got Here
Key to Pronunciation
Making Core English Poetry

 

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